The last time I saw Katie was almost ten years ago. We were discussion group leaders in a women’s Bible study and saw each other weekly. During one of those meetings, Katie announced that she was stepping down from leadership in order to commit full-time to her writing. I remember being impressed and, mostly, envious.

Five books later, Katie is living the writing life. She came to mind as I wondered who I could talk to about the publishing business and the experiences of an established author. Though she’s been in her “writer’s cave” for the past few months working on her sixth novel, Katie has agreed to come out of it for a few hours and let me quiz her on the writing life.

For busy writers, a 90-minute lunch equals a few thousand words lounging around in their heads instead of filling up blank pages. So I’m going to be prepared when I meet with Katie and have my questions ready. After we finish catching up and swapping photos of our kids, I’ll pull up my list and begin what I know will be a good conversation with my friend.

Here are the 10 questions I plan to ask:

  1. When did you first, without hesitation, call yourself a writer?
  2. What’s the earliest memory you have of writing a story?
  3. What is your least favorite part of the writing process?
  4. How do you work with an editor without the pride thing getting in the way?
  5. What technology do you use for writing?
  6. How do you keep from resenting your duties and every human’s sleeping requirement when you have to stop writing to take care of them?
  7. Describe your writing style in ten words or less.
  8. When you hear from your readers, what do they say?
  9. How do you use social media to promote your writing?
  10. How is this world a better place because of your books?

You can see that the questions range from basic to personal (I struggle with #6). I consider the time she’s giving me to be a gift, so I don’t want to bore her with too many of the standard interview questions. Hopefully these will keep her interest.

I’ll share what I learn from Katie in a future post. [Update: Here's the post with her answers.]

Question: What other questions would be useful for a new writer to have answered by a published author?


 

5 Responses to Ten questions I’ll be asking a published author

  1. I’d probably ask her a couple of things:

    1) What’s the biggest mistake new writers make?
    2) How on earth do you write an effective synopsis?

    *These might be slightly reflective of my current frustrations. ;-)

  2. #6 is a doozy. Good one! (I try very hard not to be jealous of a friend who doesn’t have a day job and gets to write all day)

    You touch on this with #9, but how about – “How do you balance the craft of writing with the business of writing?” (author’s platform, etc etc etc)

  3. [...] A full-time writer: To be, or not to be. How do you keep from resenting your duties and every human’s sleeping requirement when you have to stop writing to take care of them? —Darla McDavid in “Ten questions I’ll be asking a published author” [...]

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